One Easy Way to Market Yourself in your Resume

Make a marketing move on your resume with a headline.

This is one simple fix helps shift your resume from a professional list of experiences to a marketing document. A headline is located under your contact information and above your branding statement.

Don't complicate it. The headline is the job you are applying for. It’s the billboard that shouts the purpose of your resume.

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You are not only branding yourself as said position but listing the job title up top in your document is advantageous for ATS.

⚡️BONUS MOVE: Add the most important keywords found in the job ad underneath your headline that is also synonymous with your skillset.

FOR EXAMPLE:

Headline >> Product Manager

Keywords >> Cloud-Based Product Development | Project Management | Information Technology

Three Tips to Uncover Your Value through Resume Writing

Resume writing is a strenuous process. But like all hard things, the work is worth it.

I recently was chatting with a client who purchased my resume branding workbook. She had a seemingly unconnected work history with leaps and jumps. She had a hard time connecting the dots so she knew employers would too.

She was trying to establish credibility in a new field and was thinking of pursuing a graduate degree. Once she identified themes and the connective tissue of her work life in the resume writing process- her value popped before her eyes. Graduate work didn't seem so important anymore.

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Do you know you know your value? Can you communicate what you uniquely bring to the table? If you are in the same struggle:

▶︎ Identify your strengths. Reflect on what skills you like using. What do others acknowledge in you? What are you consistently asked to do?

▶︎ Look for themes in your professional history. Layout your past and see what themes emerge. Do you typically volunteer to manage projects? Have you always enjoyed leading teams? Are you first to see the solution to a problem?

▶︎ Compare yourself to typical applicants. In other words, identify your unique value proposition. What experience, skill, credential or accomplishment makes you different from others that will typically apply. Once you identify it, own it!

We have the perfect guide to unlock your value. Find it here.

Personal Hobbies: Resume Worthy or Not?

Should you share personal hobbies on your resume?

The National Resume Writers Association Ask the Expert contributors tackle this very question today on the blog.

Want the cliff notes version?

Always write your resume with your career goal and target audience in mind. If your personal activities showcase why you are uniquely qualified for the job, work it in. If not, don't!

🚨CAUTIONARY NOTE: Be careful to include activities that invite unconscious bias. Check out Lisa Rangel's answer for this smart tip.

Take a look - it's a worthwhile read!

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3 Things to Consider Before You Hire a Resume Writer

You loathe updating your resume. You want career fulfillment, but does this task alone slow you down? If so, hire a resume writer.

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I honestly didn't know this was a thing until a few years ago. Maybe you didn't either. Think you would benefit from resume writing services? First:

📍Have a clear career goal. Targeted resumes perform better. A "general resume" will do you no favors so if you are struggling to nail down your focus hire a career coach first!

📍Get in the marketing mindset. Every detail about your life and work history may not be relevant to your career target. These details are important to who you are, but they are not necessarily important for this resume or for this job target. The goal is for your resume to tell a curated story about who you are and what you can do.

📍Do your research. Find a resume writer that is right for you. Ask friends for a referral or use professional association listings within The National Resume Writers Association or the Professional Association of Resume Writers/Career Coaches to start the process. Above all, trust and connect with your writer. The resume writer/client relationship is and should be a collaborative one.

Ready to start the resume writing process? Let’s collaborate!

Don't Let Being Remote Work Against You

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You can't be in two places at once. A groundbreaking concept I know.

University of California-Santa Barbara researchers study found that office face time leads to greater career advancement due to perceived productivity and commitment. What does this mean for approximately 3.9 million U.S. remote workers?

According to a recent Business Insider article, remote workers prove their commitment by blurring work/life boundaries and work overtime to compensate for their lack of office presence.

Remote workers, how do you counteract this phenomenon without risking burn out? A few ideas:

▶︎ Ditch audio for video. Show your face in meetings. Choose video when available.

▶︎ Responsive e-presence. Whether it is email, Facetime, Slack, etc. Be available to chat for productivity-sake and just plain office banter. Choose the most personal presence for difficult conversations.

▶︎ Be proactive in team processes. Ensure you are well-looped into communication and business processes.

Accept or Ignore?: How to Discern When to Reject a LinkedIn Request

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Not all networking is good networking. Do you agree?

This is from Caroline Ceniza-Levine and her most recent Forbes article on when to reject a LinkedIn connection request.

I look for:

A freshness date. This is Ed Han's term that I love. Basically, are they engaged, active users on LinkedIn? When did they last comment or like something? Do they share original content?

Common connections. Do we run in similar circles on LinkedIn? Do we follow the same people?

Interesting people. If I am intrigued to know more about you and understand how I can learn from you, I am all in. A note with the connection request usually makes this determination easier.

Ceniza-Levine shares her tips >> What is your methodology?

The Match of Self-Talk: How Inner Dialogue Matters for Endurance

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Self-talk is a thing. For better or worse. Your inner dialogue matters.

I was reminded of this when I was on the tennis court for the first time after 13+ year hiatus of match play. Prior to this break, tennis WAS LIFE. In the past on the court, I beat myself up with words when I missed a point or was down.

Coming back last week, I was determined not to fall into those negative mental traps, but just like years before, with the swing of my racquet, I was bullied by my thoughts. I was both physically and mentally out of shape!

But something happened. I needed the focus to move forward. Out of breath and tired, I had to reframe my self-talk for SURVIVAL - I had to talk myself into playing the very next point!

Job seeker, where do you need to talk yourself into taking the next step? Language matters so much that researchers in a 2014 study found talking to yourself in third-person is more effective than referring to yourself as 'me' or "I".

When you need endurance, train yourself with positive thoughts.

Instead of: I can't do this another day.

Say: You can take the very next step, Meg. One foot in front of the other.

Just a Monday morning PSA: Be kind to yourself.

Are you aware of how you talk to yourself? How has it helped or hurt you in your career success?

More words = More Qualified? Wrong. Three Cover Letter Tips for the Modern Job Search.

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I used to jam pack all the words I could on a page to describe why I was the best candidate for the job in my cover letters. More words = more qualified, right?

Wrong.

The verbosity of complex experiences doesn’t mean more readership, it means less. Do you have that person in your life that is constantly talking versus the one who refrains, but when s/he does speak up - it is profoundly worthwhile to listen? Be the latter in your cover letter.

The purpose of a cover letter is to illustrate how you are the perfect (or near perfect!) candidate for the job. Land an interview to tell more! Here’s how:

+ The job posting is your compass. Demonstrate your skills and qualifications for the job by first knowing what experience the company/job are requiring. Customize your letter accordingly.

+ Use bullet points to draw attention to hard and soft skills, education and/or professional experiences relevant to the posting. Let your text breathe with white space. Pack a punch with succinct sentences and powerful accomplishments.

+ Highlight memorable stories. Those applying for the position have a similar skill set. Convey what makes you unique. Illustrate your skills instead of listing them. Share a distinct professional accomplishment or a personal story tying yourself to the company or brand values. Stand out!

Give yourself the advantage by sending a strong cover letter even if not required of the posting.

What are your best cover letter tricks?

My Career Journey: Ready Pause Go Podcast

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I'm having a bit of a vulnerability hangover 😂 BUT today, I fulfill a bucket list item, by being a podcast guest. Check out episode 24 on the Ready Pause Go Podcast.

I spill all about my career journey and motherhood, in addition, to resume and LinkedIn tips if you are blowing the digital dust off your resume during your career pause.