Working Mom

Coherence over Balance: Work + Life

Do your career and life have coherence? Let's drop work/life balance from our vocabulary.

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co・her・ence [noun]: the quality of forming a unified whole.

According to the Barna Group, 50% of women are somewhat satisfied with their lives with 59% of all women (62% of moms) are dissatisfied with work/life balance. Women's priorities in the study didn't match their time commitments on their calendars. While some of this can't change, we can view our lives as a whole rather than segments to keep in balance.

Projects and tasks change in different sectors of our lives, but let's not lose the unifying threads that make you, YOU: friendship, hobbies, family, faith, etc. Instead of getting bogged down by logistics and perfection of balance, let's authentically show up without guilt or shame.

How does this play out practically?

✔︎ Use vacation time to do something you love.

✔︎ Share a meal with your neighbors. Pizza on the front lawn or backyard is easy!

✔︎ Take on the project that lights your heart on fire!

✔︎ Try something new at work or personally!

✔︎ Take your kids to soccer practice guilt-free (even if you have to leave work early!)

Show up only as you can! A unified, whole person. Coherence over a balancing act.

Motherhood at Work: The Long Game

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The decision to work for mothers isn't fixed. A recent New York Times article showcases the fluctuation of working and stay at home moms versus the "Mommy Wars" polarization.

Research shows that millions of moms since the 1970s left and returned to the workplace.

For too long, we have been talking about “stay-at-home parents” and “working parents” as if staying at home and working were fixed unchanging states.
— Jessica Grose, author of NYT article, Working Moms and Stay-at-Home Moms Are Not at War

According to the UpJohn Institute for Employment Research, a 2015 study of Mothers' Long-Term Employment Patterns revealed that research typically focuses on return to work upon maternity leave or the first few years after birth. Employment in the long game for mother's consists of much more (i.e. part-time work, etc.) and is an underdeveloped story.

This is true in my career journey.

Working parents, what has the return to work or career pivot looked like in your home? How was it evolved long-term?

Avoid Morning Disasters: 3 Morning Routine Tips

I've been there.

Yelling at kids to put on their shoes. Spilled cereal and milk. Working parents, what kind of morning routine helps you get out the door?

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Monday mornings are hard. After the hurricane of gathering small backpacks, clothed children and dropping them off at designated places, many of times I found myself crying in the preschool parking lot in my minivan after the natural disaster of the morning.

Can it be better? Most days, yes, I think so. While my office environment has changed and my kids have gotten older, there are few things I uncovered that worked for me:

☀️ Prep the night before. Pack lunches, bags and set out clothes. Prep breakfast - by that, I mean milk in a closed cup for kids to grab and cereal in a to-go bag.

☀️ Make ‘me’ time. Even if it is just 5 minutes! Whether it's drinking a cup of coffee, looking over your schedule or reading a daily devotional. Make time to wake up and hear your own thoughts.

☀️ Go tech-free. Avoid the distraction of email and social media until after drop off.