Job search

A New Study Reveals the #1 Reason People Lie on their Resume

The number one reason people lie on their resume?

GoBankingRates recently asked over a thousand people about the truthfulness of their resume. 5% of those surveyed admitted to lying (which you can guess is never a good idea), but the interesting part is the WHO and WHY.

WHO❓Women more than men (41% versus 18%) lied on their resume.

WHY❓ Cover employment gaps.

Meg Applegate, Certified Resume Writer, Job search strategist.jpg

While the findings may be surprising to some, the stat makes sense. More women take breaks to raise children and assist an aging parent (etc.) while also facing the REAL negative stigma of employment gaps in the hiring process. According to a recent ResumeGo study, candidates with gaps in work history were 45% less likely to be invited for an interview.

But there is HOPE!

In that same ResumeGo study, however, those who provided a REASON for their work gap on their resume and cover letter received 60% more interviews.

So instead of leaving your gap to the imagination or dismissing your integrity upon clicking the apply button, explain the gap!

My BEST Tip in Hiring a Resume Writer

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer, Resume Coach.jpg

How do you foster valuable relationships? By spending quality time, right? Sharing your inner longings, dreams, ambitions.

A valuable connection takes time to learn about you. Same goes with your resume writer.

My worthwhile friends understand the core of who I am and cheer me on in my personal and professional growth.

If you partner with a resume writer that spends little time getting to know you, your career goals and experiences - you'll gain little value from the relationship and modest momentum in your job search.

However, if you invest in a quality, collaborative resume writer who LISTENS, ASKS QUALITY QUESTIONS, LEARNS and UNDERSTANDS you and your career goals, just like a best friend - the relationship is PRICELESS. The movement is soaring.

Don't get by with cheap friendships in your personal life or a cheap resume writer to pursue your professional endeavors.

You'll get the value you invest.

Let’s unlock your next best opportunity together. Get started!

More words = More Qualified? Wrong. Three Cover Letter Tips for the Modern Job Search.

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer, Resume Writing, Job Search Coach.jpg

I used to jam pack all the words I could on a page to describe why I was the best candidate for the job in my cover letters. More words = more qualified, right?

Wrong.

The verbosity of complex experiences doesn’t mean more readership, it means less. Do you have that person in your life that is constantly talking versus the one who refrains, but when s/he does speak up - it is profoundly worthwhile to listen? Be the latter in your cover letter.

The purpose of a cover letter is to illustrate how you are the perfect (or near perfect!) candidate for the job. Land an interview to tell more! Here’s how:

+ The job posting is your compass. Demonstrate your skills and qualifications for the job by first knowing what experience the company/job are requiring. Customize your letter accordingly.

+ Use bullet points to draw attention to hard and soft skills, education and/or professional experiences relevant to the posting. Let your text breathe with white space. Pack a punch with succinct sentences and powerful accomplishments.

+ Highlight memorable stories. Those applying for the position have a similar skill set. Convey what makes you unique. Illustrate your skills instead of listing them. Share a distinct professional accomplishment or a personal story tying yourself to the company or brand values. Stand out!

Give yourself the advantage by sending a strong cover letter even if not required of the posting.

What are your best cover letter tricks?

Client Landed!

CLIENT LANDED_Hinge Resume.png

I am squealing with delight over my client's job search success!

I landed a VP of Marketing role! Within one week of a referral sharing my LinkedIn profile and later my resume, I interviewed and returned home with a verbal offer followed 12 hours later by a written offer!

Thank you so much for helping me define what I was looking for and showcase my skills and achievements in a way that made this interview process feel like nothing more than a conversation!

Be like the Frog: Own your Unique Value Proposition

Meg Applegate, Hinge Resume, Resume Writer, Indianapolis, IN.jpg

Being unique is hard. Take it from the frog.

After spreading out our library book haul yesterday, my three-year-old son and I read book after book plastic-covered book. At the bottom of the pile was Dev Petty's, "I Don't Want To Be A Frog" which is about, you guessed it, a frog exclaiming he doesn't want to be a frog! Instead, he wants to be a whole host of other animals with their unique capabilities. The frog thinks he is too wet, too slimy and too full of bugs.

But you know what? His three unique features save his life from a big, hairy wolf looking for lunch.

Aren't we just like the frog? Looking left and right in our workplace, the job applicant pool and in our personal life comparing (and complaining) about our distinct qualities. We would rather be like the people around us rather than different.

It isn't sameness that makes you stand out, but your differences! Own what makes you unique.

What does this mean for job seekers? Sell your unique qualities, skill set, experiences - whatever makes you, YOU! Dare to stand out, not blend in! Showcase your unique value in your resume and on Linkedin as it relates to your work and job target. Speak it out loud as you network and in your interviews. It may be the very thing that lands you the role.

What are the frog-like qualities that you shy away from? How can you use them to your advantage?

Discover + Own your Personal Brand

Speaking.jpg

I had a lot of fun presenting about personal branding at the Career Development Professionals of Indiana annual conference yesterday! We chatted about how to help college students:

▶︎ Coalesce their co-curricular, academic, professional and personal experiences to articulate their value in the workplace.

▶︎ Showcase their value and express why they are uniquely positioned to do what it is they want to do in their career documents.

▶︎ Be FOUND and ENGAGE on LinkedIn.

Beyond professional development it was fun to connect and brainstorm with new people and reconnect with IUPUI colleagues.

I'm looking forward to becoming a newly minted CDPI board member next month!



Find Strength in your Job Search

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer, Hinge Resume.jpg

Take a note from The Terminator. If you are feeling discouraged or facing obstacles you are developing mental muscles.

Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength.
— Arnold Schwarzenegger

How can you develop strength in your job search?

💪🏻 Lean on your people. You will face rejection and discouragement. Seek out personal cheerleaders that will speak the truth about who you are and give you a boost of encouragement.

💪🏻 Try something new. If you are facing walls in your job search - switch it up! Go for a quick win by talking to someone new, researching a new target company or complete a #linkedin learning course to enhance your #skills.

💪🏻 Flex your physical muscles. Take time to take care of yourself. Complete the workout or go for a walk. Do a physical activity that you enjoy!

Ask the Experts: How Do I Get Noticed by Employers?

Meg Applegate_NRWA-Ask-the-experts-contributor.png

It is a privilege to be a National Resume Writer Association’s Ask The Experts Contributor answering how to get noticed by employers when you aren’t getting callbacks from your online applications. Check out my answer along with other experts on their blog.

Psst! I’ll let you in on the secret: connect with people more than job boards.

Ask The Experts_NRWA_Meg Applegate.png

Psst! One secret that will land you the Interview.

How important is LinkedIn really in the job search? New research findings by ResumeGo has our answer. The study found that job applicants who listed their LinkedIn URL (that led to a robust profile) on their resume were 71% more likely to land an interview than those that didn’t.

Meg Applegate, resume writer & job search coach.png

So, there are two takeaways here:

Meg Applegate, Certified Resume Writer, Hinge Resume.jpg

1.   Include your custom LinkedIn URL hyperlink on your resume AND

2.   Spend time crafting a comprehensive, on-brand profile.

Increase your chances of landing an interview by making a good digital first impression.

Need help unlocking the door to your next opportunity? Check out our writing and coaching services here.

Career Passion: Destination or Process?

Meg Applegate, Hinge Resume Collaborative, Indianapolis, IN.jpg

“Do what you love.” “Follow your passion.” How many times have you received similar career advice?

I love what Angela Duckworth said in Adam Grant’s WorkLife podcast to “develop your passion" not follow it.

We treat career like a calling – something that needs to be found like uncovering a secret treasure. With this philosophy, there is even a possibility of missing it if we don’t dig around enough.

I love the idea of career passion being developed rather than found. It isn’t a destination; it’s a process. Have you missed opportunities by pursuing a singular focus? How can we encourage others in their career pursuits based on inquiry and learning rather than a linear, planned path?