LinkedIn tips

Accept or Ignore?: How to Discern When to Reject a LinkedIn Request

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Not all networking is good networking. Do you agree?

This is from Caroline Ceniza-Levine and her most recent Forbes article on when to reject a LinkedIn connection request.

I look for:

A freshness date. This is Ed Han's term that I love. Basically, are they engaged, active users on LinkedIn? When did they last comment or like something? Do they share original content?

Common connections. Do we run in similar circles on LinkedIn? Do we follow the same people?

Interesting people. If I am intrigued to know more about you and understand how I can learn from you, I am all in. A note with the connection request usually makes this determination easier.

Ceniza-Levine shares her tips >> What is your methodology?

Unemployed? Expert tips on how to handle it on LinkedIn

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How do you handle your unemployment status on your Linkedin profile? Today, The National Resume Writers’ Association round-up of career experts tackle the issue.

From keywords in strategic areas (i.e. headline, summary and job titles) to utilizing volunteer work, board positions and project-based work to fill in the gap are just a couple ways to strategically position yourself for your next opportunity. Check out all the expert answers here.

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Give + Receive: The Power of LinkedIn Recommendations

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Help a colleague grow. Add to their credibility and visibility by giving them a recommendation on linkedIn.

Profiles with recommendations rank higher in search results and you are three times more likely to be contacted than someone without a recommendation.

Unsure what to write? Tell a compelling story about a particular project, accomplishment or skill of your colleague.

Are you looking to add recommendations to your profile? Don’t be shy. Request them! Ask a potential recommender in person or over phone/email before sending the request on LinkedIn. I actually encourage my clients to write their own recommendations.

Yep, you heard me. This way you get to highlight the specific skill or achievement of your choosing (and it cuts the work out for the recommender!). From there, encourage the recommender to tweak, add or delete content from your original draft.

It’s a win, win for everyone!

Remember recommendations you write for others can be viewed on your profile as well so check your grammar and spelling and take pride in what you’ve written!

Need LinkedIn help? We can help you unlock opportunities with coaching!

How do you use your 100 characters? A LinkedIn Job Title Trick

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Likely, you wear many hats at your job. You perform different key functions throughout your day. Don't be limited to the job title you were given by your company to describe what you do on LinkedIn! You have 100 characters for each job title under your experience section. Use them!

Here are a few examples:

Assistant Branch Manager ≫ Customer Service Leader ≫ Talent Development ≫ Retail Banking

VP / Vice President of National Sales | Senior Sales Executive | Revenue Growth | Sales Strategy

 Assistant Director of Student Life | Leadership Development | Training | Higher Education

Job titles are prominently placed (and in bold!) on your profile. Consider adding an accomplishment instead of keywords or functions next to your job title. 

For example:

Corporate Service Coordinator | Hotel Event Planner | Corporate Sales ► Launched first ABC Hotel

How do you use your 100 characters

What do people think about You? One FREE way to find Out!

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I’ve always wanted the ability to read people’s minds. Now you can.

Find out what people think of you based on your LinkedIn profile headshot with Photofeeler.

Photofeeler is a data science company that according to their website helps people “land good jobs and life partners.” You can now learn if people find you competent, likable and influential in categories of business, social and dating.

I decided to give it a go with my LinkedIn profile photo!

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Just download your photo, choose a category and enter your job title. Then wait for votes from others regarding your competency, likability and influence.

Check out my results from my LinkedIn profile photo:

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I recommend to test out a few photos and then choose the photo that best represents YOU and the vibe you want to project. Whether you are heading into a job search or leveraging your expertise online, effectively optimize your photo for your professional endeavors.

The Mantel of LinkedIn: Your Headline

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I love interior design. I find how you decorate your home is a form of self-expression. Giving someone a peek into your home is like sharing a glimpse of you.

Your LinkedIn headline is much the same if you take advantage of the space. You see your headline is like the fireplace in your home – the centerpiece.

I live in a historic home and back in the day, the fireplace was the hub of the home for cooking and the focus of family gatherings. While today, we do our cooking elsewhere, the utility of a fireplace (keeping warm) pairs with the design focal point of a home – the mantel.

Your LinkedIn headline has the same components. On a platform with over a half a billion people, you need to be FOUND using the LinkedIn search bar with keywords (i.e. what you actually do). This is your utility. Do you sell insurance or program computers?

Now, keep the readers’ attention by giving a glimpse into your unique design. Just as you carefully select pieces for your mantel to display, do the same with the descriptors in your headline. Showcase your unique personality and skills like artifacts on your mantel.

Replace your current job title as your headline with your utility and unique design.

What tips or formulas have helped you write an effective LinkedIn headline?

How To Write A LinkedIn Recommendation

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Help a colleague grow. Add to their credibility and visibility by giving them a recommendation on LinkedIn.

Profiles with recommendations rank higher in search results and are three times more likely to be contacted.

Unsure what to write? Tell a compelling story about a particular project, accomplishment or skill of your colleague.

Are you looking to add recommendations to your profile? Don’t be shy. Request them!

Ask a potential recommender in person or over phone/email before sending the request on LinkedIn. Within the request, I encourage my clients to write their own recommendation.

Yep, you heard me.

This way you get to highlight the specific skill or achievement of your choosing [and it cuts the work out for the recommender!] From there, encourage the recommender to tweak, add or delete content from your original draft. It’s a win, win for everyone!

What tips and tricks have served you well regarding recommendations?

Hope is Not a Job Search Strategy

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In the job search feeling hopeful is important, but it isn’t a strategy.

Choose five things to do each day that will get you to your new gig. Write this short to-do list on a notecard.

Small habits create big results over time.

What activities could be on your notecard?

➜ Create/share industry-related content on your LinkedIn profile.

➜ Tailor your resume and cover letter for a job posting of interest.

➜ Grow your LinkedIn network with intentional connections.

➜ Set up an informational interview with a new connection to be a student of their career path and what they do!

➜ Add one company to your target company list and follow the company on socialmedia.

Get to it! You got this!

Horse on Roller Skates: A Skill Set Mismatch

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Do you ever feel like a horse on roller skates?

Err..let me rephrase that.

Do you ever feel like your job doesn’t match your skill set? You have more or different to offer that isn’t being met in your current role.

If you are unsure how to explore this mismatch start with LinkedIn! Use your skills as search terms and see what jobs and/or people come up. Peruse the postings and study the career direction of those that come up in your search.

Need more tips on how to hone a new career direction? Download our free tip sheet and put your professional disparities out to pasture (yep, I couldn’t help myself!).

Location is Key

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Your zip code is a type of keyword on LinkedIn.

There are over a half of billion professionals on the platform - help people find you!

This five digit number gives your network a clue on where you want to land that new job or client so you come up in relevant search results.

Be strategic. Your listed zip code doesn’t have to be where you live. It can be where you work or somewhere in the middle. Are you looking to relocate? Insert your desired zip code instead. This way you will pop up in recruiter searches for your location of choice.