Resume writing

One Easy Way to Market Yourself in your Resume

Make a marketing move on your resume with a headline.

This is one simple fix helps shift your resume from a professional list of experiences to a marketing document. A headline is located under your contact information and above your branding statement.

Don't complicate it. The headline is the job you are applying for. It’s the billboard that shouts the purpose of your resume.

kate-trysh-Dnkr_lmdKi8-unsplash.jpg

You are not only branding yourself as said position but listing the job title up top in your document is advantageous for ATS.

⚡️BONUS MOVE: Add the most important keywords found in the job ad underneath your headline that is also synonymous with your skillset.

FOR EXAMPLE:

Headline >> Product Manager

Keywords >> Cloud-Based Product Development | Project Management | Information Technology

Three Tips to Uncover Your Value through Resume Writing

Resume writing is a strenuous process. But like all hard things, the work is worth it.

I recently was chatting with a client who purchased my resume branding workbook. She had a seemingly unconnected work history with leaps and jumps. She had a hard time connecting the dots so she knew employers would too.

She was trying to establish credibility in a new field and was thinking of pursuing a graduate degree. Once she identified themes and the connective tissue of her work life in the resume writing process- her value popped before her eyes. Graduate work didn't seem so important anymore.

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer for High-Achieving Women.jpg

Do you know you know your value? Can you communicate what you uniquely bring to the table? If you are in the same struggle:

▶︎ Identify your strengths. Reflect on what skills you like using. What do others acknowledge in you? What are you consistently asked to do?

▶︎ Look for themes in your professional history. Layout your past and see what themes emerge. Do you typically volunteer to manage projects? Have you always enjoyed leading teams? Are you first to see the solution to a problem?

▶︎ Compare yourself to typical applicants. In other words, identify your unique value proposition. What experience, skill, credential or accomplishment makes you different from others that will typically apply. Once you identify it, own it!

We have the perfect guide to unlock your value. Find it here.

Is there a New Way to Write Resumes in 2019? The NRWA Experts Answer!

Meg Applegate_NRWA-Ask-the-experts-contributor.png

It is a privilege to be featured on The National Resume Writer’s Association’s Ask the Experts blog with other certified resume writers this week answering the question: I realize resumes have changed over time; is there a new way of writing resumes in 2019 and beyond?

You can check out the round-up of answers here. Most focus on the importance of:

▶︎ Concise Writing. Attention-spans are short and recruiters/hiring managers first scan a resume, so include only relevant career history focusing on achievements and results instead of job functions

▶︎ Your personal brand. Showcase what you can do for a company instead of describing what you want in a job in an old-school objective statement. Articulate your value clearly in your resume and LinkedIn profile.

Meg Applegate, NRWA Ask The Expert Contributor.png

▶︎ Modern format and design elements. Consider color and modern design elements to drive how you will deliver results for a company.

Don't Hide! Bring your Accomplishments forward with one simple Question.

Resume bullet points, hinge resume, Meg Applegate.jpg

Don't make it difficult to spot your qualifications in your resume, draw attention to them! Excite your reader with your career story instead of inviting them to nap between the lines.

YOU create the narrative within the six-second scan so draw the reader in by ➡️ quantifying results, ➡️ highlighting challenges you overcame and ➡️ the action you took to get there.

Replace dense paragraphs describing your professional accomplishments with bulleted, lean achievement-driven statements. How do you get from paragraph to bullet point? Keep asking yourself, "So what?" For example:

I help customers on the phone and increase customer satisfaction.

So what?

I created a procedure for call handling to ensure calls aren't missed.

So what?

I did this so well I was asked to create the customer satisfaction function of our company improving missed customer calls.

And so on. Boil it down to quantifiable, difference-making bullet points:

▶︎ Created the company's customer satisfaction experience function from scratch.

▶︎ Decreased missed inbound calls by 30% in six weeks by developing a new call handling standard operating procedure (SOP).

It takes time and more mental brain power to express yourself succinctly. Resume writing is hard work - so be patient with yourself.

Take time to pack the punch. When you do the work on paper, it is easier to articulate your value in person.

So, keep asking yourself: "So what?"

Need more help unlocking powerful resume statements? Download our free bullet point writing formula.

One Simple Trick to Take the Weight out of your To-Do List

Do you have that one thing that you keep pushing down on your to-do list?

Yeah, that one.

Mine has been on my list for MONTHS...and I just checked it off this week. Cue the balloon drop and fireworks!

Meg Applegate, Resume Writer.jpg

What's weighing down your weekly to-do list? Mine was a certification course. It was just TOO BIG to get done in seven days. Looking back, I needed to take my Dad's sage advice on how to eat an elephant...one bite at a time.

Do you feel like this with your resume? You are blowing off the digital dust and it just feels too overwhelming to start. Take one bite at a time.

Gather materials. Collect performance reviews and assessment results, grab your kudos file and revisit projects finished and clients won to remember your professional wins.

Conduct a SWOT analysis on yourself. Evaluate your strengths and weaknesses and identify opportunities and threats.

Know your job target. Learn the ropes of your next job through online and in-person research. (This can take time - break it up!)

Write. Yep, just start. Go section by section or job by job.

Edit. Eliminate fluff and ensure quantifiable accomplishment statements replace paragraphs of job duties.

What stops you from updating your resume?

Remember: Add only the bites to the to-do list, not the whole elephant.

Need a helping hand? Collaborate with Meg on your professional resume. Find out more here.

Summary to Specific: Free Bullet Point Writing Formula

Meg Applegate, CPRW.jpg

Stuck trying to craft stellar bullet points to describe your accomplishments on your resume? Move away from summaries to specifics. For example:

- Increased profitability and reduced costs within the first year and a half in position.

TO

- Added $1M net margin by reducing the cost of materials by 14.4% in the first 18 months of the position.

Need a bullet point breakdown? I’ve got you covered. Grab your free free bullet point writing formula here.

Little things matter BIG!

Meg Applegate, CPRW_Hinge Resume.jpg

My library book haul this weekend is all about the little things. Daily decisions, little moments and even small, mundane choices. I'm learning the small stuff matters. They make an impact in life and in resume writing.

Magical little life things:

+ Playing board games with my son on sick days.

+ Exchanging secrets with my daughter at bedtime.

+ A lit candle and music playing during dinner prep.

Small resume touches:

+ Periods at the end of bullet points to tie a bow on a high-impact statement.

+ A clean, custom LinkedIn URL (instead of the gobbly-gook link provided).

+ Bolding a professional accomplishment to make it pop.

+ Sharp, distinct action verbs.

What small things are making a difference in your life or your job search right now?

Be YOU in your resume - Choose your words Wisely!

Meg Applegate, Certified Professional Resume Writer.jpg

Mind the language you use to describe yourself in your resume. It matters. Language is powerful. Wisely use a mix of words that describe only YOU. No one should be able to lift content from your resume as their own because it should describe only YOUR story, not solely the responsibilities of your job title.

A branding statement is key in articulating who you are on your resume. I use a three-step process when writing branding statements for my clients focusing on:

1. The distinguishing factors of WHO you are.

2. The WHAT of unique professional achievements

and

3. the WHERE of career direction.

What method(s) do you use to make your resume stand out and really describe YOU?


Need resume branding help? Grab a DIY mini-workbook here.


3 Attention-Grabbing Features that ensure Recruiters Read your Resume

Recruiters are lingering 1.4 seconds longer on your resume according to The Ladders, Inc. 2018 Eye-Tracking Study. From 6 seconds in 2012 to now 7.4 seconds in 2018, recruiters are spending more time with your resume.

resume writing tips, Indianapolis resume writing service_Hinge Resume Collaborative.jpg

Are you applying with confidence or committing resume faux-pas?

The worst resumes, according to the study, leave little white space, include keywords out of context (i.e. keyword stuffing) and have a chaotic format.

What ensures a lengthier look from a recruiter? Note three commonalities among high performing resumes:

  1. A simple layout: Clear headings and text within a format that reads in an “E” or “F” pattern.

  2. Bold job titles with professional accomplishments bulleted underneath.

  3. A branded statement within the top-third of the resume.

Unsure your resume is up to par?

Join our free, 30-minute online resume workshop on Thursday, January 10 at 8:30 PM EST with our Certified Professional Resume Writer, Meg Applegate. We will discuss how to infuse keywords within your document and articulate your professional value and accomplishments in a modern resume format.

Land your dream job in 2019! Only a few more days left to register. Grab your seat here.