career values

Work is Stressful: Five ways to combat the Daily Grind

No matter your gender, seniority or generation, stress at work leaves no one untouched. According to LinkedIn, the number one stressor is workload (as it relates to work-life balance) followed by future job security and career direction/purpose.

This report found executive Gen-Xer's are the most stressed followed by Baby Boomers and then Millennials.

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How can you combat work stress to ENJOY your life and work?

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✔︎ Learn to say no. Know and understand your own priorities in both your work and personal life. When you say no to something, you are saying yes to something else.

✔︎ Upskill. Own your own professional development as an eager student to add to your skill set.

✔︎ Own your life (and work) as a journey. There is always time to pivot or recalibrate your career trajectory.

✔︎ Laugh! Find humor in small things.

✔︎ Do something you love. Whether during work or personal time, make time to do what you enjoy. Running? Re-decorating? Reading? Just do it!

What are your keys to less stress?

Personal Policies for your Job Search

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Why is it so hard to say 'no' as an adult?

The word easily tumbles out of my kids' mouths like granola bar crumbs from their wrapper.

Is it because we are afraid to disappoint (who are my people pleasers?), don’t want to appear lazy or is it just a lack of boundaries?

My friend taught me this idea of having personal policies. For example, when I take my kids to the local zoo, I have a personal policy that I don’t visit the snakes. So when it is just me and the kids (sans husband), we avoid the ‘desert’ section of the zoo. Silly, I know, but a personal policy nonetheless.

What could personal policies look like in your job search?

✳️ Consider only positions that require 25% travel or less.

✳️ A two-hour time limit per day on job search activities.

✳️ One self-care activity in your daily regimen.

✳️ Target companies with a high value for innovation.

What are your personal policies? How do they extend to the workplace or your job search?

Career Passion: Destination or Process?

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“Do what you love.” “Follow your passion.” How many times have you received similar career advice?

I love what Angela Duckworth said in Adam Grant’s WorkLife podcast to “develop your passion" not follow it.

We treat career like a calling – something that needs to be found like uncovering a secret treasure. With this philosophy, there is even a possibility of missing it if we don’t dig around enough.

I love the idea of career passion being developed rather than found. It isn’t a destination; it’s a process. Have you missed opportunities by pursuing a singular focus? How can we encourage others in their career pursuits based on inquiry and learning rather than a linear, planned path?

Little things matter BIG!

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My library book haul this weekend is all about the little things. Daily decisions, little moments and even small, mundane choices. I'm learning the small stuff matters. They make an impact in life and in resume writing.

Magical little life things:

+ Playing board games with my son on sick days.

+ Exchanging secrets with my daughter at bedtime.

+ A lit candle and music playing during dinner prep.

Small resume touches:

+ Periods at the end of bullet points to tie a bow on a high-impact statement.

+ A clean, custom LinkedIn URL (instead of the gobbly-gook link provided).

+ Bolding a professional accomplishment to make it pop.

+ Sharp, distinct action verbs.

What small things are making a difference in your life or your job search right now?

Do you have a Free Range Career? 3 tips to coalesce your Professional Experiences

When we talk about a 'career path' it gives the sense of a linear direction, but when I look at back at my professional history - my path is not well-worn or straight, but squiggly and intersecting. 

Have you roamed in wide open professional spaces creating trails instead of a well-worn path? Perhaps wandering from job to job has been your MO and now you are getting tired of lacking direction. Maybe your career path is similar to the chickens that lay the free-range eggs that you eat for breakfast. You like me, have a free range career. 

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If you are ready to gain a sense of direction or connect the dots of your wanderings to find a meaningful true north, start by nailing down a career target. To start:

+ Reflect on your professional paths. Take note of the wanderings that brought you to life and which drained you. 

+ Identify your key skills. What are you known for? What problems are you an expert at solving? 

+ Uncover your career values. Discover what motivates you and is most important to you. Is it prosperity? Creativity? Achievement? Discern the career values that are unique to you.

Need more tips to clarify your career focus? Download them here.



Wanted: Flexible Work Schedules

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Do you want more control over your time at work? You are in the majority.

According to Robert Half, an HR consulting firm, 88% of employees surveyed wanted a flexible work schedule with only 62% of employers offering flexibility. 66% wanted a compressed work week with only 17% of companies offering the option.

While employers are slow to the punch, experts say flexibility is in our future. A tight labor market will catalyze this direction.

So when it comes time to negotiate for your next role or advancement in your annual review - think 'out of the office' and propose flexible solutions that are conducive to both your employer and your personal/work life balance.

Check out the recent CNBC article about the topic here.

Make a Difference in your Office: One EASY Way!

‘Tis the season to be thankful.

However, one gratitude project shows Americans aren’t grateful for their jobs or those in their workplace.

According to John Templeton Foundation’s Expanding Gratitude Project, 2 out of 5 respondents never expressed gratitude to their boss and 29% never conveyed thanks to their colleagues.

My husband snapped this photo when reading the Indianapolis Business Journal yesterday:

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What’s going on here? Are people miserable at work, despise colleagues or just self-focused?

According to the authors of The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins To Ignite Joy, Engagement and Creativity at Work, an employee’s perception, motivation and emotions of happenings within the work day directly affect work performance and behavior toward coworkers.

Perhaps Americans are lacking meaningful work or being stifled at the office in a myriad of ways. Either way, it seems lonely to be in management and tough to be part of an office team.

Consider being a gratuitous difference maker in your workplace. Try it on for size. Today thank, adore, appreciate and genuinely compliment. Look around and smile. Say I see you and the difference you are making around here.

‘Tis the season to buy a coffee for a colleague or write a quick note. Let’s appreciate each other.

A Glue Stick + Your Dream Job

What do you want to be when you grow up?

No, seriously. There is still time to dream and to live out your dreams.

Develop a job description for your perfect job. Get out your kid's glue stick and gather old magazines and create a vision board. Envision your ideal personal and professional life down to the detail!

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Uncover your *most* important career values through this process. Is it essential to feel a sense of achievement in your job? Perhaps creativity? Maybe when you get down to it, it is really about making the big bucks. Figure it out!

Now, reach for it! Do one thing today to get you there.

Need more activities for tomorrow to clarify your professional focus? Download our six, free DIY tips here.